Scammers commit fraud

Tips to protect yourself from Social Security ScamsThe Social Security Administration uses emails, text messages, and social media to provide information on their programs and services. They will not, however, request personal or financial information through these methods. Sometimes, they send emails with information that are particular to your needs, usually after a discussion with you in person or over the phone. When Social Security makes phone contact, it is often to confirm the legitimacy of claims.

It is important to beware of scammers pretending to be from Social Security. Reports about fraudulent phone calls from people claiming to be from Social Security continue to increase, and recent reports have indicated unknown callers are using increasingly threatening language in these calls. If you receive a suspicious call from someone alleging to be from Social Security, hang up, and then report details of the call to the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) at https://oig.ssa.gov/.

How to report fraud

Do you suspect someone of committing fraud, waste, or abuse against Social Security? You can contact the Office of the Inspector General’s fraud hotline at 1-800-269-0271 or submit a report online at https://oig.ssa.gov/.

If you receive a suspicious call from someone alleging to be from Social Security, hang up, and then report details of the call to the Office of the Inspector General at https://oig.ssa.gov/.

Social Security Adminstration’s investigations are most successful when you provide as much information as possible about the alleged suspect(s) and/or victim(s) involved. The more you can tell us, the better chance we have of determining whether a crime has been committed. As you fill out a fraud allegation, please include the following about the alleged suspect(s) and/or victim(s):

  • Names.
  • Addresses.
  • Telephone numbers.
  • Dates of birth.
  • Social Security numbers.

It’s helpful to know facts about the alleged fraud, such as:

  • Description of the fraud.
  • Location where the fraud took place.
  • When the fraud took place.
  • How the fraud was committed.
  • Why the person committed the fraud (if known).
  • Who else has knowledge of the potential violation.

OIG will carefully review your allegation and take appropriate action. However, they cannot provide information regarding the actions taken on any reported allegation. Federal regulations prohibit the disclosure of information contained in law enforcement records, even to the individual making the allegation.

To learn more about reporting fraud, visit OIG’s Reporting Other Issues page. You will find information about Misuse of Social Security Numbers, Elder Abuse, Direct Express Account Fraud, and more.